"A House on Fire” Examines Race and Racism within Adventism

A House on Fire: How Adventist Faith Responds to Race and Racism, edited by Maury D. Jackson and Nathan Brown (Signs Publishing, 2022)


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://spectrummagazine.org/node/12168
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Reading it now, excellent!

I have a lot of time for Nathan. He is insightful, articulate and very thoughtful.

Our SDA social structure in communities associated with our institutions, such as schools and hospitals, would be of interest, I believe. This would require some field work and extensive interviews by someone with research experience. Similar to Ron Lawson’s insightful analysis of our Adventist ghettos.

That said, an incidental comment about racism in a book review by a La Sierra alumna piqued my interest…


https://journals.iupui.edu/index.php/teachingwriting/article/view/26156/24217

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Adventist Peace Fellowship has a podcast series “Nathan and Mo Go to College” which I’ve enjoyed. This book review reflects fruits of some issues relating to the advanced degree studies! Looking forward to reading the essays…happy to see the wide representation of authors with distinct and individual voices.
Also, the 2018 Ronald Lawson article (link attached in comment by Joselito Coo) on social structure was very interesting and informative. It clarifies more about the processes and reasons for emerging louder voices offering alternatives to fundamental Adventism.
One thing that makes me sad is when questioning Adventists leave Christianity altogether when unable to reconcile problems with parts of Adventist dogma and practices.
I am a rural and retired professional with limited local contact of more open minded Adventist Christians. Forum dialogues through magazines, podcasts, zooms, etc are appreciated.
Thank you for publishing these insightful articles offering an alternative and hope.

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Sounds like an excellent sequel to The Silent Church by Plantak. The earlier book demonstrated that our understanding of human rights and social justice was limited to self-interest.