Divine Counsel and Consequences

Like a father or mother lovingly raising that first child, God has counseled human beings since He created them. Furthermore, after their sin, He did not coerce their free will. However, they received the consequences of their decisions. Very early in the formation of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, God chose Ellen G. White as a channel through which to deliver His counsel. Six years before the American Civil War began, counsel was provided regarding a federal law to return runaway slaves to their master: "the law of our land requiring us to deliver a slave to his master, we are not to obey."[1] Thus, Mrs. White’s counsel to the very young church was anti-slavery.

The above counsel was responsible for the embrace of Charles M. Kinny who was born a slave in Richmond, Virginia, in 1855.[2] He was ten years old when the Civil War ended. Working his way west to Reno, Nevada, he attended a series of evangelistic lectures by J. N. Loughborough in 1878. Mrs. Ellen G. White visited Reno during these meetings, and on July 30 she preached to Loughborough's crowd of 400. Kinny never forgot that sermon. He accepted the Seventh-day Adventist message and was baptized on the last day of September 1878. As one of the seven charter members of the Reno church, he was elected church clerk and secretary of the Nevada Tract and Missionary Society. How he had been educated is not known, but he was chosen for a responsible position. In this position, he wrote quarterly reports for the Review, telling of the progress of the Nevada Tract and Missionary Society. So promising was his work that local church members in Reno, together with the California Conference, sent him to Healdsburg College (now Pacific Union College) in California from 1883 to 1885 for further education. Mrs. White was living in Healdsburg at this time, and Kinny must often have heard her speak during his college years.[3]

In 1885, the California Conference sent Kinny to Topeka, Kansas to begin work among the Black people there. He started on the first of June, and by mid-October had canvassed a third of the town with Adventist books and tracts. In 1889, Kinny was sent to a church in St. Louis, Missouri that had been organized two years earlier and had more than 50 members. Many, if not the majority, of the members were white but there was a growing interest among Blacks, especially after Kinny's arrival. It was here, in St. Louis, that Kinny probably first experienced racial prejudice in the Adventist Church. Kinny's encounter with race prejudice in the St. Louis church is particularly interesting because Ellen White visited the city shortly after he left, and she too observed the problem. In 1891, in her appeal to the General Conference Committee for a more aggressive work among black people, she recalled her experience in St. Louis to point out racism in the Adventist denomination.[4] This outcome suggests that although individual members still had an issue with racial equality, counsel from God through Sister White regarding race relations had not changed.

On October 5, 1889, Kinny was ordained the first Black Seventh-day Adventist minister. On February 16, 1890, he organized the Louisville Seventh-day Adventist Church as the second Black Seventh-day Adventist church in the world. In August of that year, he began working with the first Black SDA church at Edgefield Junction, Tennessee. This church had been organized seven years earlier in 1883, and Harry Lowe, a local member, had been granted a ministerial license to watch over the little group.

Two years after his ordination, Pastor Kinny was invited to attend the 1891 General Conference Session in Battle Creek, Michigan. It was at this session that Ellen G. White delivered her famous address, “Our Duty to the Colored People,” and Kinny delivered a talk outlining steps he thought necessary to bring success to the work among Black people. This GC Session marks the beginning of a turning point for race relations within the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

At the 1891 General Conference Session, the decision was made to send Ellen G. White to Australia (thus, putting greater distance between counsel and church leadership in America), and church support for evangelizing African Americans was not made available, especially in the South. Notwithstanding, Elder Kinny accelerated his efforts among African Americans. On June 13, 1891, he organized the third Black SDA church in Bowling Green, Kentucky. A year later, after nine months of work in New Orleans, he organized the fourth Black SDA church there. Two years later, on September 15 and 16, 1894, he organized the fifth church among Black Seventh-day Adventists, in Nashville, Tennessee.

During this same period, God raised up Edson White who headed down the Mississippi River for Vicksburg on a riverboat loaded with white Adventists. For six years, Edson became the spokesman for the work among Black people, doing exactly what Kinny had suggested, giving his whole time to them, building up the various branches, developing native talents, educating them, and getting them into the work. Given the large number of African Americans in the South who had been freed by the Civil War, successful evangelism among Blacks had the potential to “overrun” the Southern Union and create a serious racial imbalance. A policy was needed to protect white Adventists. In Robert M. Kilgore’s words (1890): “The work in the South for the White population will not be successful until there is a policy of segregation between the races.” This proposed policy was probably not aligned with God’s counsel through E. G. White, but she was in Australia.

Borne three years before the Civil War started, A. G. Daniells was primed to facilitate adoption of the Kilgore policy. He joined Robert M. Kilgore in Texas as tent master in 1878, and, eventually, became the longest serving president of the General Conference. During his tent master days, a mentor-mentee bond developed between him and Elder Kilgore, and Elder Kilgore eventually became president of the South Union of Seventh-day Adventists. In 1890, a policy was voted by the General Conference to enhance evangelism among whites in the South by endorsing segregation. These two men (Kilgore and Daniells) played a pivotal role in the Adventist Church adopting and implementing the Kilgore policy. Kilgore authored the policy and facilitated its adoption, and Daniells facilitated its greater implementation. For many Seventh-day Adventists, this policy became doctrine. Also, it probably became the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s first policy on race relations. Has this policy ever been rescinded?

Where would the Seventh-day Adventist Church be today if the recommended policy had not been adopted?

Let me respond to this question with a question: Where would the SDA church be if its position on tobacco, alcohol, unclean meat, illegal drugs, immorality, and tithe had changed? Clearly, the church’s tenacious hold on these biblically supported positions is the primary reason why many new converts do not smoke, drink alcohol, eat unclean meat, sell or use illegal drugs, avoid immoral behavior, and pay tithe. Yet, God’s word provides as much support for racial equality as it does for any of the above. Furthermore, lessening the requirement for one discourages compliance with the others.

After the Holy Spirit anointed Apostle Peter, Peter preached and 3,000 souls were converted, but he was still a bigot. Did the Holy Spirit’s anointing of Peter justify or approve of his bigotry? We don’t think so! Being used by the Holy Spirit should not be confused with being changed by the Holy Spirit. The latter (being changed by the Holy Spirit) requires personal consent! When Peter was given the dream of clean and unclean animals, told to rise, slay and eat, and God said don’t call anything I made clean or common,[5] Peter was ready to let the Holy Spirit change him; he was ready for the Holy Spirit to take away his bigotry. Clearly, a person cannot be saved if that person refuses to let the Holy Spirit change or recreate him or her. Could a repeal of the Kilgore policy have the potential to lead people to let the Holy Spirit free them from racial and cultural prejudices?

Affirmative decisions regarding tobacco, alcohol, unclean meat, Sabbath observance, etc. must be registered before a person becomes a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Perhaps if racial equality were among these affirmative decisions, the middle wall separating the races might begin disappearing. The middle wall is there because the racial inequality policy, at times, encouraged an inequitable process for dispersing resources. Interesting, the same person who proposed the segregation policy proposed creation of Black or regional conferences. And, this policy was consistent with Kilgore’s earlier policy, which had been approved.

We submit if the Seventh-day Adventist Church had embraced the counsel on race relations provided by God through E. G. White, the church’s profile would be very different today. Where there is division, there would be unity. Where there is membership stagnation, there would be membership growth. Where there is drifting, there would be mission. And, where there is repelling, there would be attraction. When Jesus met the Samaritan woman at the well, she received His ministry because He embraced her. Also, Peter never could have ministered effectively to Cornelius if he had not permitted the Holy Spirit to cleanse him of his bigotry.

Emphatically, the time has come for change! Spiritual forces of evil struck a near fatal blow to the Seventh-day Adventist Church, but God is still the God who lifted Paul from a heap of stones that were thrown to kill him. We need to repent! Starting with church leadership, all members should humble themselves, fast, and pray for God to do for them what He did for Peter. I believe this outcome will release a power and an influence we have not seen in a long, long time.

 

Notes & References:

[1] E. G. White (1948). Testimonies numbers 1 to 14. Testimonies, Vol 1, page 202.

[2] http://www.blacksdahistory.org/charles-kinny.html

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid.

[5] Acts 10:9-27

 

Melvin Davis, Ph.D. is a retired college administrator and professor of psychology. He is married to Sheila Davis, Ph.D., NP for 47 years, and they have two daughters, two sons-in-law, and five grandchildren. As lifetime Seventh-day Adventists, Melvin and Sheila own and operate A Natural Way Family Health Clinic in Mississippi.

Willie Davis, Jr. holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theology from Oakwood College (now Oakwood University) and a Master of Arts in Theology degree with a concentration in Systematic Theology from Andrews University. He is a retired educator after over 30 years of service in Adventist, public and other parochial institutions. He is married to Sara Frances Albury-Davis and together, they are the proud parents of five daughters, two sons, one daughter-in-law and one son-in-law. Their eight grandchildren are the joys of their hearts. His deeply religious up-bringing, with stern rules to live by, laid the foundation for his commitment to serving God, his fellow man and living his life as a committed Seventh-day Adventist.

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://spectrummagazine.org/node/10698
1 Like

I like the history lesson and thoughts presented. Being a dynamic believer in Christ has the inherent meaning of admitting past mistakes and making changes in our lives. One would assume that also includes the .org?

Yes, I assume it does include it!
But we still have to see the principle applied in poractice. Keep the hope though!
:wink:

1 Like

The author writes: “Furthermore, after their sin, He did not coerce their free will.”, i ask to what extent was their will free? “Free” implies a power that is free to do as it pleases.
i ask what creature is “free” to do as it pleases?
Paul in Romans ch7 clearly states that he is not free to do good as he wishes.
"free will’ is a faith destroying lie.

Through the chosen channels (the prophets and patriarchs) God has revealed something new – of his will, the present and the future. Whereas, Ellen White had nothing new or firsthand to give to her subjects, but what has already been settled and decided through their Bible study and good reasoning. All she did was to endorse it by her ‘yes, or no’ through her visions!

"When the laws of men conflict with the word and law of God, we are to obey the latter, whatever the consequences may be. The law of our land requiring us to deliver a slave to his master, we are not to obey; and we must abide the consequences of violating this law. The slave is not the property of any man. God is his rightful master, and man has no right to take God’s workmanship into his hands, and claim him as his own." (1T, p. 201.2, 1855; To5, p. 22.2, 1859).
However, this counsel (against anti-slavery) was not the first of its kind, there were others who had come up with this counsel five years before her!
Here is the reaction and decision of the Boston Baptist church to the “Fugitive Slave Bill”.
“Whereas, The recently passed "Fugitive Bill,” is a part and parcel of the same atheistical code and in direct and manifest opposition to the revealed will and law of God, who requires us “To deliver him…out of the hand of the oppressor,”…."Thou shalt not deliver unto his master the servant which is escaped from his master"…Resolved, That as disciples of Christ and members of his church we ought not, we cannot, as we fear God, we will not render obedience to the said law. … for a moment to give it the supremacy over the law of God, with which it is at direct and manifest war.
We do indee recognize our duty with all meekness, to abide whatever penalties a wicked and oppressive government may see fit to inflict upon us for our fidelity to the laws of God" (The Fugitive Slave Bill or God’s Laws Paramount to the laws of Men, by Nathaniel Clover, p. 2, 1850).
"Whenever the law of any civil government demands of its subjects either active or passive disobedience to the known will or law of god, disobedience to former, in favor of the latter becomes imperative duty" (Ibid., p. 5).

3 Likes

This is Maŕtin Luther’s greatest heresy.

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You mean the GC can over rule God’s chosen representative on earth? And based on Matthew 16:19, “I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; whatever you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven,” God will certainly meet his match when He decides to bring His perfect saints home to heaven.

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I have always wondered why GC made this decision. Was this the only reason, or were there also personality clashes? I would like to hear from one of our historians.

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Chris, are you protestant?

What about you? Are you one? Adventists are Protestants!

1 Like

Apparently someone has been making unauthorized copies of certain keys??? :thinking: :thinking:

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I have the impression that he @ABEN is a Protestant. After all, he “protests” a lot, isn’t it?.. :roll_eyes: :innocent:

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Yes George, ‘The Bible only’ Adventists do protest!

1 Like

Ellen White on Color Question, Testimonies for the Church, vol. 9, 1909

1. We are not to agitate the color line question , and thus arouse prejudice and bring about a crisis. 9T, p. 209, 1909

2. Let white and colored people be labored for in separate, distinct lines , and let the Lord take care of the rest. 9T, p.210, 1909.

3. Let colored workers labor for their own people, assisted by white workers as occasion demands. They will often need counsel and advice . Let the colored believers have their place of worship and the white believers their place of worship . 9T, p. 210, 1909.

4. Great care must be exercised that nothing be said or done to inflame the feelings of the colored people against the whites. Let us not aggravate the difficulties that already exist . 9T, p. 211, 1909.

5 . We are to avoid entering into contention over the problem of the color line . 9T, p. 213, 1909

6 . No one is capable of clearly defining the proper position of the colored people . 9T, p.213, 1909.

7. Let white workers labor for the white people . 9T, p. 214, 1909.

8. Let colored laborers do what they can to keep abreast, working earnestly for their own people . 9T, p. 214, 1909.

9. The colored people should not urge that they be placed on an equality with white people. The relation of the two races has been a matter hard to deal with, and I fear that it will ever remain a most perplexing problem . 9T, p.214, 1909.

10. Our colored ministers are to be treated with consideration. This has not always been done . 9T, p. 223, 1909.
(I believe the colored ministers in the Adventist church are treated equal with their white brethren).

2 Likes

This is one of the best articles–maybe the best–I have read on the subject and history of race relations in the SDA Church. Long ago I wrote letters to administrators and the AR to make equality and integration as part of our lifestyle baptismal vows. Again it needed to be one of the 28 fundamental beliefs from the beginning (perhaps more important than some obscure ones included). The decision made by these men was wrong and has plagued the church ever since.

The context needs to be included in these selected quotes (out of context). The church was forced in the south to segregate because of the unconverted hearts of so many whites who would not go near an integrated church to hear truth. This has happened in other parts of the western world to a lesser extent, but I believe has changed.

In order to draw white people to hear another way, it had to be allowed but still is no excuse for what the two leaders noted above made a command. It needed to be changed as racial truth came to light. It is interesting how some of our ancestors were so blind to this issue mostly in the south. It took many thousands of lives of both white and Black souls in the north. (Too bad this isn’t noted more). The whole nation was NOT included in the travesty, and the north gave many lives for the freedom of the south…
As in other ethnic groups–usually because of language and sometimes a personal choice of one’s own rich cultural heritage and traditions–there are ethnic churches, and we should all attend them on occasion or even join. I would join such a church because of my interest in other cultures. But my local church is fully integrated already.

2 Likes

**

[quote=“spectrumbot, post:1, topic:20718, full:true”]

Like a father or mother lovingly raising that first child, God has counseled human beings since He created them. Furthermore, after their sin, He did not coerce their free will. However, they received the consequences of their decisions. Very early in the formation of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, God chose Ellen G. White as a channel through which to deliver His counsel. Six years before the American Civil War began, counsel was provided regarding a federal law to return runaway slaves to their master: "the law of our land requiring us to deliver a slave to his master, we are not to obey."[1] Thus, Mrs. White’s counsel to the very young church was anti-slavery.

The above counsel was responsible for the embrace of Charles M. Kinny who was born a slave in Richmond, Virginia, in 1855.[2] He was ten years old when the Civil War ended. Working his way west to Reno, Nevada, he attended a series of evangelistic lectures by J. N. Loughborough in 1878. Mrs. Ellen G. White visited Reno during these meetings, and on July 30 she preached to Loughborough's crowd of 400. Kinny never forgot that sermon. He accepted the Seventh-day Adventist message and was baptized on the last day of September 1878. As one of the seven charter members of the Reno church, he was elected church clerk and secretary of the Nevada Tract and Missionary Society. How he had been educated is not known, but he was chosen for a responsible position. In this position, he wrote quarterly reports for the Review, telling of the progress of the Nevada Tract and Missionary Society. So promising was his work that local church members in Reno, together with the California Conference, sent him to Healdsburg College (now Pacific Union College) in California from 1883 to 1885 for further education. Mrs. White was living in Healdsburg at this time, and Kinny must often have heard her speak during his college years.[3]

In 1885, the California Conference sent Kinny to Topeka, Kansas to begin work among the Black people there. He started on the first of June, and by mid-October had canvassed a third of the town with Adventist books and tracts. In 1889, Kinny was sent to a church in St. Louis, Missouri that had been organized two years earlier and had more than 50 members. Many, if not the majority, of the members were white but there was a growing interest among Blacks, especially after Kinny's arrival. It was here, in St. Louis, that Kinny probably first experienced racial prejudice in the Adventist Church. Kinny's encounter with race prejudice in the St. Louis church is particularly interesting because Ellen White visited the city shortly after he left, and she too observed the problem. In 1891, in her appeal to the General Conference Committee for a more aggressive work among black people, she recalled her experience in St. Louis to point out racism in the Adventist denomination.[4] This outcome suggests that although individual members still had an issue with racial equality, counsel from God through Sister White regarding race relations had not changed.

On October 5, 1889, Kinny was ordained the first Black Seventh-day Adventist minister. On February 16, 1890, he organized the Louisville Seventh-day Adventist Church as the second Black Seventh-day Adventist church in the world. In August of that year, he began working with the first Black SDA church at Edgefield Junction, Tennessee. This church had been organized seven years earlier in 1883, and Harry Lowe, a local member, had been granted a ministerial license to watch over the little group.

Two years after his ordination, Pastor Kinny was invited to attend the 1891 General Conference Session in Battle Creek, Michigan. It was at this session that Ellen G. White delivered her famous address, “Our Duty to the Colored People,” and Kinny delivered a talk outlining steps he thought necessary to bring success to the work among Black people. This GC Session marks the beginning of a turning point for race relations within the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

At the 1891 General Conference Session, the decision was made to send Ellen G. White to Australia (thus, putting greater distance between counsel and church leadership in America), and church support for evangelizing African Americans was not made available, especially in the South. Notwithstanding, Elder Kinny accelerated his efforts among African Americans. On June 13, 1891, he organized the third Black SDA church in Bowling Green, Kentucky. A year later, after nine months of work in New Orleans, he organized the fourth Black SDA church there. Two years later, on September 15 and 16, 1894, he organized the fifth church among Black Seventh-day Adventists, in Nashville, Tennessee.

During this same period, God raised up Edson White who headed down the Mississippi River for Vicksburg on a riverboat loaded with white Adventists. For six years, Edson became the spokesman for the work among Black people, doing exactly what Kinny had suggested, giving his whole time to them, building up the various branches, developing native talents, educating them, and getting them into the work. Given the large number of African Americans in the South who had been freed by the Civil War, successful evangelism among Blacks had the potential to “overrun” the Southern Union and create a serious racial imbalance. A policy was needed to protect white Adventists. In Robert M. Kilgore’s words (1890): “The work in the South for the White population will not be successful until there is a policy of segregation between the races.” This proposed policy was probably not aligned with God’s counsel through E. G. White, but she was in Australia.

Borne three years before the Civil War started, A. G. Daniells was primed to facilitate adoption of the Kilgore policy. He joined Robert M. Kilgore in Texas as tent master in 1878, and, eventually, became the longest serving president of the General Conference. During his tent master days, a mentor-mentee bond developed between him and Elder Kilgore, and Elder Kilgore eventually became president of the South Union of Seventh-day Adventists. In 1890, a policy was voted by the General Conference to enhance evangelism among whites in the South by endorsing segregation. These two men (Kilgore and Daniells) played a pivotal role in the Adventist Church adopting and implementing the Kilgore policy. Kilgore authored the policy and facilitated its adoption, and Daniells facilitated its greater implementation. For many Seventh-day Adventists, this policy became doctrine. Also, it probably became the Seventh-day Adventist Church’s first policy on race relations. Has this policy ever been rescinded?

Where would the Seventh-day Adventist Church be today if the recommended policy had not been adopted?

Let me respond to this question with a question: Where would the SDA church be if its position on tobacco, alcohol, unclean meat, illegal drugs, immorality, and tithe had changed? Clearly, the church’s tenacious hold on these biblically supported positions is the primary reason why many new converts do not smoke, drink alcohol, eat unclean meat, sell or use illegal drugs, avoid immoral behavior, and pay tithe. Yet, God’s word provides as much support for racial equality as it does for any of the above. Furthermore, lessening the requirement for one discourages compliance with the others.

After the Holy Spirit anointed Apostle Peter, Peter preached and 3,000 souls were converted, but he was still a bigot. Did the Holy Spirit’s anointing of Peter justify or approve of his bigotry? We don’t think so! Being used by the Holy Spirit should not be confused with being changed by the Holy Spirit. The latter (being changed by the Holy Spirit) requires personal consent! When Peter was given the dream of clean and unclean animals, told to rise, slay and eat, and God said don’t call anything I made clean or common,[5] Peter was ready to let the Holy Spirit change him; he was ready for the Holy Spirit to take away his bigotry. Clearly, a person cannot be saved if that person refuses to let the Holy Spirit change or recreate him or her. Could a repeal of the Kilgore policy have the potential to lead people to let the Holy Spirit free them from racial and cultural prejudices?

Affirmative decisions regarding tobacco, alcohol, unclean meat, Sabbath observance, etc. must be registered before a person becomes a member of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Perhaps if racial equality were among these affirmative decisions, the middle wall separating the races might begin disappearing. The middle wall is there because the racial inequality policy, at times, encouraged an inequitable process for dispersing resources. Interesting, the same person who proposed the segregation policy proposed creation of Black or regional conferences. And, this policy was consistent with Kilgore’s earlier policy, which had been approved.

We submit if the Seventh-day Adventist Church had embraced the counsel on race relations provided by God through E. G. White, the church’s profile would be very different today. Where there is division, there would be unity. Where there is membership stagnation, there would be membership growth. Where there is drifting, there would be mission. And, where there is repelling, there would be attraction. When Jesus met the Samaritan woman at the well, she received His ministry because He embraced her. Also, Peter never could have ministered effectively to Cornelius if he had not permitted the Holy Spirit to cleanse him of his bigotry.

Emphatically, the time has come for change! Spiritual forces of evil struck a near fatal blow to the Seventh-day Adventist Church, but God is still the God who lifted Paul from a heap of stones that were thrown to kill him. We need to repent! Starting with church leadership, all members should humble themselves, fast, and pray for God to do for them what He did for Peter. I believe this outcome will release a power and an influence we have not seen in a long, long time.

 

Notes & References:

[1] E. G. White (1948). Testimonies numbers 1 to 14. Testimonies, Vol 1, page 202.

[2] http://www.blacksdahistory.org/charles-kinny.html

[3] Ibid

[4] Ibid.

[5] Acts 10:9-27

 

Melvin Davis, Ph.D. is a retired college administrator and professor of psychology. He is married to Sheila Davis, Ph.D., NP for 47 years, and they have two daughters, two sons-in-law, and five grandchildren. As lifetime Seventh-day Adventists, Melvin and Sheila own and operate A Natural Way Family Health Clinic in Mississippi.

Willie Davis, Jr. holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theology from Oakwood College (now Oakwood University) and a Master of Arts in Theology degree with a concentration in Systematic Theology from Andrews University. He is a retired educator after over 30 years of service in Adventist, public and other parochial institutions. He is married to Sara Frances Albury-Davis and together, they are the proud parents of five daughters, two sons, one daughter-in-law and one son-in-law. Their eight grandchildren are the joys of their hearts. His deeply religious up-bringing, with stern rules to live by, laid the foundation for his commitment to serving God, his fellow man and living his life as a committed Seventh-day Adventist.

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

 

We invite you to join our community through conversation by commenting below. We ask that you engage in courteous and respectful discourse. You can view our full commenting policy by clicking here.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://spectrummagazine.org/node/10698 [/quote]timely essay on how admittedly imperfect SDA denomination dealt w "elephant in the room" of converting non-white peoples to belief in Jesus Christ and SDA doctrines while also converting majority whites with explicitly or implicitly racial prejudices to Jesus and SDA doctrines.I was unaware of the denomination's Kilgore segregation policy, and am saddened by it but in the context of post-Civil War racism, I understand it. I am pleased to see current essays by SDA unions backing Black Lives Matter which is the metaphor for confronting racial prejudice and hate but also for exhorting the sacredness of human life for all homo sapiens in every way, gender, race, religions, LGBTQ, abilities and disabilities,nations, etc, etc. Let's exhort the SDA leadership to proclaim that to Jesus, All Human Beings Matter, that Jesus loves others and loves mercy, justice and the courage to take a righteous stand against opposition to these moral imperatives and protections. 6 sept. 2020

strong text

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I am not sure what point you are trying to convey with all those quotes from the SOP. God allowed the children of Israel to have a King, not because He wanted it, but because of their stubbornness. So it was with Ellen White. She was not endorsing segregation, she was just being pragmatic. Whites refused to view blacks as equals, and in order for the message to spread amongst blacks, it was best for them to work with their own people. We don’t know what God would have done if the Jewish converts had not accepted the gentiles. I am sure that God would have had a plan B, He always had when we refused to cooperate with Him.

2 Likes

I dont know that the Jewish Christians did accept the gentiles. Paul certainly had problems with them. And let’s not forget, it was the Jewish branch under Peter who was the start of western christianity. The progressive, righteousness by faith side of the church is mostly lost to history in the east. Someone probably can provide more background on the eastern branch.

Christopher,
Thank you for the link to Rev. Colver’s response to the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law.
I found it fascinating reading. I was impressed by many of his arguments and Biblical examples to follow.

Rev. Colver stops short of recommending that anyone actively assist a slave to freedom. He says he is not competent to advise as to the extent and manner of disobedience to the law; no definite rule can be prescribed. He does courageously say that it is right to protect the fugitive and hide him from his pursuers.
Slavery was abolished in the British empire in 1834 and as a result the ‘underground railroad’ was initiated to help slaves reach Canada (a British colony at the time). Surely the reverend would have known of it. Perhaps he counselled such assistance privately but realized that publicly recommending such blatant illegal activity would be too inflammatory and would place him and his church in an untenable position.

One of the rationalizations for slavery was that the slave was not a full human being (I think 3/5ths human was settled upon). Thus he was ‘a thing’ and so could be bought, sold and owned. I liked Rev. Colver’s argument that God, as Creator, owns all of us and any claim of ownership by one man over another is felonious.
I remember viewing a short Nazi propaganda film in which the video switched repeatedly between groups of Jews and rats scurrying for cover.
I have also read that in times past some rabbis preached that the Gentile soul was inferior to that of the Jew, that it was somewhere between that of a Jew and that of an animal.
This discounting of others is often a precursor to their oppression.

3 Likes