"Little Boy" Movie Reveals The Complexities of Childlike Faith


(Spectrumbot) #1

Upon seeing the trailer, I was honestly skeptical as I am about most Christian films. Is it going to represent Christianity well? Is it going to be cheesy or simplistic or fundamental? Will it be theologically sound? Will it be well-made? Will it be boring as dirt? All these fears come upon me when going to see a Christian film. Not because I want it to fail, but because I want it to succeed. While most of the world may not attend church, they will watch a movie and I want them to be taken to the next level in their walk with God. I want the film to speak to the heart of the individual and give them hope of what life has to offer with God in the picture. And that was the goal of the filmmakers of this movie as well.

Metanoia Films was birthed out of a dream to “entertain while inspiring.” Their first film was “Bella” and now this is their second—“Little Boy.” The writer of the film, Alejandro Monteverde, shared that statistically kids are spending 6-8 minutes/day having quality conversation with their families and 8 hours/day on some form of media. So, film is a powerful way to reach those who may not be reached otherwise—particularly young people. One of the producers of the film, Eduardo Verastagui, says that they are hoping this film will encourage people to “love more and judge less.” It certainly inspired me!

I got the privilege to attend two pre-screenings of “Little Boy,” one hosted by the the former Mexican president Vicente Fox, the film's producer/actor Eduardo Verastegui, and the founder of the Martin Hennessy Foundation (which seeks to teach underprivileged kids to play tennis and achieve their goals in school and life), Ryan Wolfington. The second pre-screening was hosted by Jewel, the recording artist, who has come to be a major supporter and fan of the movie.

From left to right: Recording artist, Jewel; this review's author; writer/director Alejandro Monteverde

The film is set in the 1940’s during WWII, where a little boy’s love for his war-bound father sets him on a journey to experience real love and a faith that works as he tries to figure out if his faith can bring his Dad home. The film stars include Kevin James, Micheal Rapaport, Emily Watson, David Henrie, Tom Wilkinson, and many more.

The film's trailer (see below) did not do the movie justice. It left me feeling like it may be a little simplistic or cheesy, but the film itself was dynamic, inspirational, honest, and did a superb job at revealing the complexities of faith through the journey of a child.

Only 86 minutes long, it is not an emotionally static film. You will laugh. You will cry. You will ponder. You will rejoice. You will worry. And you just might be inspired to love better and grow in your faith journey. The movie has two different viewpoints throughout, and it doesn’t give you an answer. I appreciated this because it gave the film a more realistic feel and allowed the viewer to form their own opinions without taking away from the message. Brilliantly done! The film is available in select theaters now. For some powerful behind the scenes stories and to see read more about the film, visit the Little Boy Movie website.

 

Brandy Kirstein is a lactation consultant, pastor's wife, mommy, and Christian film advocate in Chattanooga, Tennessee.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://spectrummagazine.org/node/6777

(Thomas J Zwemer) #2

the reviewer is right, the trailer is not compelling to see the film. My father did not go to war I did. but during the great Depression my father took work often far from home. home comings were great joy. A father is a critical figure in an family.“why would Christ teach use to pray 'Our Father which art in heaven”? And use the analogy of adoption? Paul’s admonition is critical in developing a correct honest view of God in small children that will last a life time.,

War is hell, Family can be and should be heaven on earth. Tom Z