Luke

This evangelist is generally supposed to have been a physician, and a companion of the apostle Paul. The style of his writings, and his acquaintance with the Jewish rites and usages, sufficiently show that he was a Jew, while his knowledge of the Greek language and his name, speak his Gentile origin. He is first mentioned (Acts 16:10-11), as with Paul at Troas, whence he attended him to Jerusalem, and was with him in his voyage, and in his imprisonment at Rome. This Gospel appears to be designed to supersede many defective and unauthentic narratives in circulation, and to give a genuine and inspired account of the life, miracles, and doctrines of our Lord, learned from those who heard and witnessed his discourses and miracles.

1-4. Luke will not write of things about which Christians may safely differ from one another, and hesitate within themselves; but the things which are, and ought to be surely believed. The doctrine of Christ is what the wisest and best of men have ventured their souls upon with confidence and satisfaction. And the great events whereon our hopes depend, have been recorded by those who were from the beginning eye-witnesses and ministers of the word, and who were perfected in their understanding of them through Divine inspiration.

Verses 5-25 The father and mother of John the Baptist were sinners as all are, and were justified and saved in the same way as others; but they were eminent for piety and integrity. They had no children, and it could not be expected that Elisabeth should have any in her old age. While Zacharias was burning incense in the temple, the whole multitude of the people were praying without. All the prayers we offer up to God, are acceptable and successful only by Christ's intercession in the temple of God above. We cannot expect an interest therein if we do not pray, and pray with our spirits, and are not earnest in prayer. Nor can we expect that the best of our prayers should gain acceptance, and bring an answer of peace, but through the mediation of Christ, whoever lives, making intercession. The prayers Zacharias often made, received an answer of peace. Prayers of faith are filed in heaven, and are not forgotten. Prayers made when we were young and entering into the world, may be answered when we are old and going out of the world. Mercies are doubly sweet that are given in answer to prayer. Zacharias shall have a son in his old age, who shall be instrumental in the conversion of many souls to God, and preparing them to receive the gospel of Christ. He shall go before Him with courage, zeal, holiness, and a mind dead to earthly interests and pleasures. The disobedient and rebellious would be brought back to the wisdom of their righteous forefathers, or rather, brought to attend to the wisdom of that Just One who was coming among them. Zacharias heard all that the angel said; but his unbelief spake. In striking him dumb, God dealt justly with him, because he had objected against God's word. We may admire the patience of God towards us. God dealt kindly with him, for thus he prevented his speaking any more distrustful, unbelieving words. Thus also God confirmed his faith. If by the rebukes we are under for our sin, we are brought to give the more credit to the word of God, we have no reason to complain. Even real believers are apt to dishonour God by unbelief; and their mouths are stopped in silence and confusion, when otherwise they would have been praising God with joy and gratitude. In God's gracious dealings with us we ought to observe his gracious regards to us. He has looked on us with compassion and favour, and therefore has thus dealt with us.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://spectrummagazine.org/node/6730

Here’s a plausible rationale for the Gospel of Luke and the ensuing Book of Acts: In Roman trials, a person of means or with a generous benefactor could hire a scholar to produce a document explaining who the person was, including any previous encounters with various courts. The document would be read by the court and entered as testimony as to character. motive or opportunity related to the charges involved. Luke, who had traveled extensively with Paul, as his companion and doctor, knew the apostle’s life in detail, and the role he had played in various activities. Luke composed the letter for the benefactor named Theophilus, who possibly presented the document in Paul’s trial.

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In Luke’s prologue he is careful to explain that he is using accounts of events as they were handed down by those who from the outset were eyewitnesses. After carefully going over the whole story from the beginning, he is writing that account.

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And in the adult Sabbath School Quarterly, this is used as justification for EGW’s unacknowledged borrowing from other sources. The logic? If it’s good for the goose, it’s good for the gander. One doesn’t need to read too far between the lines to see the agenda.

Thanks…

Frank

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It’s ok to borrow from others, so long as you acknowledge and reference it.

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Other than the forward to the latest edition of the Great Controversy, she didn’t. And, over a century after her death, the church is still doing apologetics to justify it. This quarterly is the latest example.

Thanks,

Frank

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Yes I know. …

her history was biased and the final chapters are concocted postulates. even the abridged version was trash. “its Friday but Sunday is coming!” Tom Z

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Tony Campolo cannot be excelled with his famous sermon: “Sunday is Coming.”

And Adventists chose to reject the most important event; the only event in Christian history. How sad to turn back to Judaism: :cry:

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Thank you Graham, that was the best explanation of Theophilus I’ve heard, and I shared it with my SS class this morning. This lesson would have been a good opportunity to look into the details around the birth of Christ e.g. the birth not happening the night they arrived and the definition of “inn” etc. I’m looking forward to the lessons on the parables as I have only recently found out details that add depth, understanding and colour. Shame i haven’t heard of them before and that it took me over 50 years to find out, but then Kenneth Bailey is not an Adventist…

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Or return it once you’ve used it :wink:

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What event have Adventists rejected? And what do you mean by the only event in Christian history? There have been many events in Christian history: the Incarnation; the death and resurrection of Jesus; Pentecost; the apostasy; the Dark Ages; the Protestant Reformation . . .

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Birder, such an inane question doesn’t deserve a response. “ONLY” indicates that without that one event you, nor all the millions would be Christians today. All the rest is incidental to that one event.

Without belief in the Resurrection there would be no belief in the Incarnation, simply just another birth. Without the Resurrection there would be no Pentecost; no reason for apostasy, no Dark Ages of religious control, and no Reformation from which to rebel against the one Christian church.

Your lack of history is only secondary to the ability to understand. (Excessive. - webEd)

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Pici,
Is there ANY event in history that would have ANY relevance if the Resurrection had not happened?
Go to a grocery store, put all you want in your basket, but if you don’t have that one “good green stuff” at the register, you are getting none home!

This is the “interpretation” of what Elaine was saying! I can help again, any time you have difficulty understanding her language… @ageis7 - - :wink:

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ROFL…
Elaine, you are sure still the best entertainer here!!!

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You didn’t answer my question. What event have Adventists rejected?

The limitations of the written word. I really wasn’t sure where she was going with that. But I guess that is to be expected from someone who lacks history and understanding.

So, it’s obviously time to focus on improving in those two areas…You will be 90 soon… :slight_smile:

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Thanks for the reminder, young man. :smile:

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For starters: that OId Covenant made with Israel should be the one for Christians and disregarding the New Covenant specifically given to them with the elimination of the Law and now accepting Christ as our guide.