The Rhythms of Life


(reliquum) #21

It sends the message to me at least that God is less concerned with how/who sinned, and more with how to woo them back. I think the rest of writ, as well the life and blood of Jesus reveals that unmistakably.


(Frank Peacham) #22

You might be right. Yet at the moment I think the love of Adam for Eve was forgiving and self-sacrificing. Loving relationships are almost impossible to break.

Remember that Eve just wanted to be like God, whom she must have respected enough to desire this. She was very aware of her lack of education, thus accepting the idea that she could know good and evil. Eve was gullible and lacked what we would call “street wisdom.” She was innocent minded, seeing no harm or danger in anything.

The chief fault was Eve was: she saw no reason to follow the advice God had given to not eat from this tree. This is the common fault of us all–why should I keep God’s command…is there not an easier way…it make no sense to me.

The chief fault of Adam was: Without much thought or consideration as to options or appeals he let the impulse of his heart rule his judgment. Is not matters of the heart and rash decisions a common fault of us all!

The Chief aim of the Serpent was: To twist and break up human relationships and create distrust in God and his commands.

A problem for God: Communication, communication…effective and uniform communication to humanity. There is a world of difference between Moses and the Prophets and Kings & Jesus and Paul. There is enormous diversity between those who claim to know and understand the will of God.


(Lynden Williams) #23

I have conflicting thoughts as to the motivation of Adam when confronted with the problematic mistake made by eve. Some in the thread have pointed out Adam’s great love and affection for Eve, so rather than facing the thought of losing her, he at the fruit as well. Sounds reasonable, until you see his confrontation with God. You forget that Adam then threw Eve under the bus. What happened to that altruistic act of self-sacrifice at that point?

A bigger question everyone should be asking is: Why did God cast the devil and his angles to this earth, when there are literally an unlimited number of other places He could have sent them. Preferably, to an uninhabited planet. Why was it necessary to allow the devil to “tempt” man? Why couldn’t humans have been given the same opportunity as Lucifer was, which was that sin had to have originated in the mind of these created beings instead of being coerced by a beguiling creature? In other words, why does sin have to originate through the exertion of an outside force, rather than through our own imaginings?

I’ve never had a satisfactory answer to the above question. I am willing to change my mind if someone can make a plausible explanation