TikTok Users on “Losing My Religion”

From its early beginnings as Musical.ly, TikTok has evolved significantly from the “dance app” it once was. According to a recent study, TikTok users are the second most active group on social media, spending an average of 1.5 hours per day using the app.


This is a companion discussion topic for the original entry at http://spectrummagazine.org/node/12053
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I found it hard to respect “the church” when I realized that my mother wasn’t being paid as much as the male teachers. My dad left her with three kids to make her own way in the world that existed about 60 years ago. A world that included “the church” deciding that women didn’t deserve “head of household” pay, no matter their circumstances. I know full well that my faith can’t be in “the church” - it has to be between God and me, but that is very hard to understand, especially as a hurting young person. I think it benefitted me to “lose religion” and focus on faith.

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I didn’t lose my religion.

Instead, I found out that organized religion is a “blind leading the blind”, hopelessly lost proposition.

:wink:

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This article is a stark visual reminder of why superficial platitudes, deceptions, power plays, and blithe dismissals of abuse in any form are contrary to the ethos of Jesus of Nazareth.

As Augustine of Hippo declared, “Charity is no substitute for justice withheld.”

Also, not everyone is called to leave the body, the community of the church. Some are called to stay, to challenge, to redeem, to reinvent, to speak the truth in love. The courage called for is to stand unabashedly for justice both within and without the church.

“Those who have a voice must speak for those who are voiceless” (Oscar Romero).

Thank you for sharing.

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It’s easy to lose faith for vulnerable youth who believe everything they hear from church leaders who don’t know the love of God (or have common sense). The church is the tail in most social issues and has always been. They follow the world instead of leading. The traditional idea of hell has turned more away from religion than any other “doctrine.”

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Some say insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

Others insist that insanity is trying to satisfy the insatiable or perturb those who are self-satisfied.

The Third Maxim of The Oracle at Delphi claims that “Certainty brings insanity.”

Combining these with that old saw about being wise enough to know the difference between that which can and cannot be changed, it seems reasonable to conclude that staying in church in order to transform church into something it is not and absolutely does not want to be-i.e., changeable and uncertain-is demonstrably unwise and will almost certainly make a person crazy!

:wink:

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You’re right, Bruce. That’s why I don’t argue with people online anymore–even if they intentionally ignore that “the glass is half full” and that a Christocentric community based on righteousness by love can actually be marvelously liberating for all.

Because hey! I’m not crazy.

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Yes, the church was focused on gender qualifications. When my husband went for post-graduate work in Philadelphia, I got a job at Philadelphia Jr. Academy. By then I had learned to ask for what I was due, so I asked to for “head of household” status since my husband was a fulltime student. With a bit of wrangling, I did manage to get it. I knew to pursue it because of my previous experience at my first job in New Jersey.

Starting my first job, straight out of college, one of the teachers asked if I had received my “curtain allowance”. I had no clue what that was, and said - no; so the guy said, “you have to ask for those things, or they won’t give it to you”. This struck me odd coming from a “church-run” operation. Why would that not be automatic, if that was the policy… I’m not sure how I was able to get the " the head of house," since later, another teacher, in the same situation, was denied.

…and then came Marikay …

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You’re a better man than me, Chris.

But then again, it seems a little argumentative to imply that one should stick with religion because it might a liberating, “half full” glass when I’ve just gone on record saying that I’m convinced the glass is bone dry.

I’m not sayin you’re wrong and I’m right.

I’m just saying that an argumentative person like myself might rightly, wrongly or even perhaps crazily suspect he was being drawn into a debate…

:wink:

I’m not saying I’m the smartest gut in the forum, @Sirje but my dad worked for the denomination from the time I was born until he started his own company so I learned from an early age that Adventism is only a religion on Saturday.

The rest of the week it’s a “business as usual” with any and all of the negative connotations thereby implied!!!

:flushed::flushed::flushed:

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I’m now wondering who the smartest gut in the forum is! :rofl: :joy:

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I can’t agree with you on that as far as the folk in the pew. I think most of them are sincere and follow whatever comes down from the upper crust. Most are hard-working people with a cursory religious, education - again, accepting what comes from church publications and the pulpit. The organization is another story, altogether. But, here too, the individuals for the most part are ok, even nice; but there is something called group dynamics. Put them altogether, and the group takes on a distinct personality - distinct or maybe even contrary to the individuals that are part of the group. That’s how Hitler managed to influence good people.

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Many have lost hope in the church today like many lost hope in the temple in Jesus’s day. Women, sinners, sick, and confused were treated as lower classes by the religious patriarchy. Only Jesus gave hope then—and only Jesus can give hope now.

I haven’t lost religion, but I’m weary of the repetitive, useless rituals, and fear warnings to manipulate and control people coming down from the top which sets a precedence on down to the local level. Jacob’s ladder looks like a caste system from here.

“I like your Christ, but not your Christianity."
-Gandhi

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I lost my religion the moment, when in deep personal crisis not of my own making, I found more community, more understanding, more loving kindness, more care, more support, more and brighter pathways to personal growth, among those deemed unclean by adventism and Christianity in general than I ever did, after years of trying, in my own congregation, denomination, and religion.

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I’ve met all kinds of interesting and genuine people while golfing and/or fishing.

Of course they’re all liars but that’s to be expected in those situations!

:wink:

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It’s hard to believe pastors would give these responses! The questions aren’t even difficult to answer!

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You haven’t changed my experience or opinion.

A lot of the nice people in church are only that way until you have to work, go to school or meet them on a ball field.

IOW, their religion fails them and doesn’t play any part in their lives, at least five or six days out of the week.

:wink:

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Great Article. The title made me think of the R.E.M. song with the same name.

So I looked it up. It boasts over a billion views on YouTube. It’s a beautiful piece of cinematography. Click the picture to load it:

I looked up the lyrics, below for you. I think they speak of the struggle in rather poetic terms:

Oh life is bigger
It’s bigger than you
And you are not me
The lengths that I will go to
The distance in your eyes
Oh no I’ve said too much
I set it up

That’s me in the corner
That’s me in the spot-light
Losing my religion
Trying to keep up with you
And I don’t know if I can do it
Oh no I’ve said too much
I haven’t said enough

I thought that I heard you laughing
I thought that I heard you sing
I think I thought I saw you try

Every whisper, of every waking hour
I’m choosing my confessions
Trying to keep an eye on you
Like a hurt, lost and blinded fool, fool
Oh no I’ve said too much
I set it up

Consider this
Consider this the hint of the century
Consider this the slip
That brought me to my knees, failed
What if all these fantasies come
Flailing around
Now I’ve said too much

I thought that I heard you laughing
I thought that I heard you sing
I think I thought I saw you try

But that was just a dream
That was just a dream

That’s me in the corner
That’s me in the spot-light
Losing my religion
Trying to keep up with you
And I don’t know if I can do it
Oh no I’ve said too much
I haven’t said enough

I thought that I heard you laughing
I thought that I heard you sing
I think I thought I saw you try

But that was just a dream
Try, cry, fly, try
That was just a dream
Just a dream
Just a dream, dream

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I guess it depends on who you know, no doubt.

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is the exodus of younger members from Christian congregations really a current thing…my memory is that many of us, finishing up college, left the Church…of course older people were leaving, too…but the most visible exodus was among the younger crowd…

i think this is something that happens in every generation…today isn’t demonstrating anything new…

this is such a good observation…“the church”, and active membership, is a very different thing than actual faith, and an actual walk with god…sometimes, or even often, it helps to distance from the church, and not allow it to become too central…i think it’s the case that gaining experience and perspective outside of anything having to do with the church can be valuable when and if the decision is made to return…but even then, a certain amount of distance is good…

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